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GEODON® (ziprasidone HCl) Use in Specific Populations

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to atypical antipsychotics, including GEODON, during pregnancy. Healthcare providers are encouraged to register patients by contacting the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics at 1-866-961-2388 or online at http://womensmentalhealth.org/clinical-and-research-programs/pregnancyregistry/.

Risk Summary

Neonates exposed to antipsychotic drugs, including GEODON, during the third trimester are at risk for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms following delivery (see Clinical Considerations). Overall available data from published epidemiologic studies of pregnant women exposed to ziprasidone have not established a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes (see Data). There are risks to the mother associated with untreated schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder and with exposure to antipsychotics, including GEODON, during pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations).

In animal studies, ziprasidone administration to pregnant rats and rabbits during organogenesis caused developmental toxicity at doses similar to recommended human doses, and was teratogenic in rabbits at 3 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD). Rats exposed to ziprasidone during gestation and lactation exhibited increased perinatal pup mortality and delayed neurobehavioral and functional development of offspring at doses less than or similar to human therapeutic doses. (see Data).

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk

There is risk to the mother from untreated schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder, including increased risk of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are associated with increased adverse perinatal outcomes, including preterm birth. It is not known if this is a direct result of the illness or other comorbid factors.

Fetal/neonatal adverse reactions

Extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms, including agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress, and feeding disorder have been reported in neonates who were exposed to antipsychotic drugs, including GEODON, during the third trimester of pregnancy. These symptoms have varied in severity. Monitor neonates for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms and manage symptoms appropriately. Some neonates recovered within hours or days without specific treatment; others required prolonged hospitalization.

Data

Human Data

Published data from observational studies, birth registries, and case reports on the use of atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy do not report a clear association with antipsychotics and major birth defects. A retrospective cohort study from a Medicaid database of 9258 women exposed to antipsychotics during pregnancy did not indicate an overall increased risk for major birth defects.

Animal Data

When ziprasidone was administered to pregnant rabbits during the period of organogenesis, an increased incidence of fetal structural abnormalities (ventricular septal defects and other cardiovascular malformations, and kidney alterations) was observed at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day (3 times the MRHD of 200 mg/day based on mg/m2 body surface area). There was no evidence to suggest that these developmental effects were secondary to maternal toxicity. The developmental no effect dose was 10 mg/kg/day (equivalent to the MRHD based on a mg/m2 body surface area). In rats, embryofetal toxicity (decreased fetal weights, delayed skeletal ossification) was observed following administration of 10 to 160 mg/kg/day (0.5 to 8 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area) during organogenesis or throughout gestation, but there was no evidence of teratogenicity. Doses of 40 and 160 mg/kg/day (2 and 8 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area) were associated with maternal toxicity. The developmental no-effect dose is 5 mg/kg/day (0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area).

There was an increase in the number of pups born dead and a decrease in postnatal survival through the first 4 days of lactation among the offspring of female rats treated during gestation and lactation with doses of 10 mg/kg/day (0.5 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area) or greater. Offspring developmental delays (decreased pup weights) and neurobehavioral functional impairment (eye opening air righting) were observed at doses of 5 mg/kg/day (0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area) or greater. A no-effect level was not established for these effects.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Limited data from a published case report indicate the presence of ziprasidone in human milk. Although there are no reports of adverse effects on a breastfed infant exposed to ziprasidone via breast milk, there are reports of excess sedation, irritability, poor feeding, and extrapyramidal symptoms (tremors and abnormal muscle movements) in infants exposed to other atypical antipsychotics through breast milk (see Clinical Considerations). There is no information on the effects of ziprasidone on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for GEODON and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from GEODON or from the mother's underlying condition.

Clinical Considerations

Infants exposed to GEODON should be monitored for excess sedation, irritability, poor feeding, and extrapyramidal symptoms (tremors and abnormal muscle movements).

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Infertility

Females

Based on the pharmacologic action of ziprasidone (D2 antagonism), treatment with GEODON may result in an increase in serum prolactin levels, which may lead to a reversible reduction in fertility in females of reproductive potential [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15) and Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of ziprasidone in pediatric patients have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of the total number of subjects in clinical studies of ziprasidone, 2.4 percent were 65 and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. Nevertheless, the presence of multiple factors that might increase the pharmacodynamic response to ziprasidone, or cause poorer tolerance or orthostasis, should lead to consideration of a lower starting dose, slower titration, and careful monitoring during the initial dosing period for some elderly patients.

Ziprasidone intramuscular has not been systematically evaluated in elderly patients (65 years and over).

8.6 Renal Impairment

Because ziprasidone is highly metabolized, with less than 1% of the drug excreted unchanged, renal impairment alone is unlikely to have a major impact on the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone. The pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone following 8 days of 20 mg twice daily dosing were similar among subjects with varying degrees of renal impairment (n=27), and subjects with normal renal function, indicating that dosage adjustment based upon the degree of renal impairment is not required. Ziprasidone is not removed by hemodialysis.

Intramuscular ziprasidone has not been systematically evaluated in elderly patients or in patients with hepatic or renal impairment. As the cyclodextrin excipient is cleared by renal filtration, ziprasidone intramuscular should be administered with caution to patients with impaired renal function [see Clinical Pharmacology (12)].

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

As ziprasidone is cleared substantially by the liver, the presence of hepatic impairment would be expected to increase the AUC of ziprasidone; a multiple-dose study at 20 mg twice daily for 5 days in subjects (n=13) with clinically significant (Childs-Pugh Class A and B) cirrhosis revealed an increase in AUC 0–12 of 13% and 34% in Childs-Pugh Class A and B, respectively, compared to a matched control group (n=14). A half-life of 7.1 hours was observed in subjects with cirrhosis compared to 4.8 hours in the control group.

8.8 Age and Gender Effects

In a multiple-dose (8 days of treatment) study involving 32 subjects, there was no difference in the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone between men and women or between elderly (>65 years) and young (18 to 45 years) subjects. Additionally, population pharmacokinetic evaluation of patients in controlled trials has revealed no evidence of clinically significant age or gender-related differences in the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone. Dosage modifications for age or gender are, therefore, not recommended.

8.9 Smoking

Based on in vitro studies utilizing human liver enzymes, ziprasidone is not a substrate for CYP1A2; smoking should therefore not have an effect on the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone. Consistent with these in vitro results, population pharmacokinetic evaluation has not revealed any significant pharmacokinetic differences between smokers and nonsmokers.

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